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Senate panel approves MacDonald bill to support charitable gaming

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Michael D. MacDonald’s legislation to use resources from the Internet Gaming Fund to cover charitable gaming license administration and enforcement was approved by the Senate Regulatory Reform Committee on Tuesday.

“This bipartisan package would help nonprofit organizations who rely on bingo nights and gaming parties to keep more of the resources they raise for their charitable causes,” said MacDonald, R-Macomb Township. “Ever since the effects of the pandemic shutdown on our charities started to emerge, I knew that something needed to be done to help keep them afloat.

“The revenue from online gaming is more than sufficient to cover the fees that would otherwise have to be paid by charitable organizations for these fundraisers. This reform would help these groups get back to being a force for good for those who truly need it.”

Eligible nonprofits in Michigan can use “millionaire parties” to raise money. These parties are charitable gaming events where wagers are placed on games of chance customarily associated with a gambling casino with participants using imitation money or chips.

Senate Bill 1111 would add costs incurred by the gaming control director or board in the administration and enforcement of millionaire parties to the list of required expenditures of revenue generated from the taxation of online gaming in the Internet Gaming Fund.

SB 1112, sponsored by Sen. Jeremy Moss, D-Southfield, would fund all necessary expenses incurred by the executive director or gaming control board in the administration and enforcement of millionaire party activity from the Internet Gaming Fund.

The bills now head to the full Senate for consideration.

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Editor’s note: The above photograph is available by clicking on the image or by visiting https://www.SenatorMichaelMacDonald.com/photos/.

Photo caption: Sen. Michael D. MacDonald, R-Macomb Township, outlines the benefits of Senate Bill 1111 before the Senate Regulatory Reform Committee. The bill is part of a bipartisan package to use resources from the Internet Gaming Fund to cover charitable gaming license administration and enforcement and enable nonprofit organizations to keep more of the money they raise.